Podcasts

Arrangements | Charles Watts | Literary Roadhouse Ep 45

Next week’s story is Kudzu by Andrea Bobotis

Rated decent

Arrangements explored the everyday judgements and stories we tell ourselves about strangers we see. Everyone seemed to like this week’s story except Maya. Was it the sudden scene changes, or does Maya just hate stories when we record too early?

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate Arrangements? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Wagons, Ho! | Padgett Powell | Literary Roadhouse Ep 44

Next week’s story is Arrangements by Charles Watts

Rated none too shabby

This week it was up to Anais to convince Maya, Gerald and Rammy of the genius of Wagons, Ho! The story left Maya irritated, Rammy annoyed and Gerald… tad confused about were he stood. The genius was apparent, but did the author lose his audience in this experiment? Anais shouts No. Maya and Rammy role their eyes and form a wall. Poor Gerald is left somewhere in the middle. Does he move closer to Maya and Rammy, or does Anais convince him of the subtle genius and lure him to the dark side?

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate Wagons, Ho? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Happy Endings | Margaret Atwood | Literary Roadhouse Ep 43

Next week’s story is Wagons, Ho! by Padgett Powell

Rated not too bad

Happy Endings is a short story the plays on the novel outlining to reflect on life, relationships, and the process of writing. In this discussion, we talk about the deeper meanings of the story, whether the format worked and what each of us took away from this exploration of what makes a story… the beginning, middle or end.

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate Happy Endings? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Cities I’ve Never Lived In | Sara Majka | Literary Roadhouse Ep 42

Cities I’ve Never Lived In

Next week’s story is Happy Endings by Margaret Atwood

Rated Clean

Cities I’ve Never Lived In was a story that slowly grew on all of us. Interesting choices in writing style and deep intellectual questions made it a great story for discussion. The story’s layers are emblematic of Hemingway’s iceberg theory, which tickled our resident emingway fan boy, Gerald. Listen as we discuss the effectiveness of essay style and tone, the narrators choices, and how this story about the ethics of poverty-based art affected us.

Are you excited for the Literary Roadhouse bookclub? It will be a monthly bookclub and our first novel is… The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood! You can get your copy here. If you want to talk to us about the book as you read, we are using the #LRHBookclub. We also will launch a second new podcast called The Bradbury Challenge.

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate Cites I’ve never lived in? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

The Nightingale and The Rose | Oscar Wilde | Literary Roadhouse Ep 41

Next week’s story is Cities I’ve Never Lived in by Sarah Majka

Rated Clean

Are you excited for the Literary Roadhouse bookclub? It will be a monthly bookclub and our first novel is… The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood! You can get your copy here. We’ll be reading the book through November/December and the first episode will be the first Friday in January which just happens to be New Years Day. So grab a copy, and tweet along with #LRHBookclub

This week we leave you with Anais trying to explain why the only good thing about The Nightingale and The Rose was the lizard. We had a great conversation about the many layers or non-layers of this great Oscar Wilde story, how it reflects the differences in how we see romance over time. Were the humans selfish, or only the girl? Was the bird a fool? Why doesn’t Anais like this story! Stay tuned and stay for a super interesting LRH game at the end cause Rammy outdid himself.

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate The Nightingale and The Rose? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

I Told You I’d Buy You Anything You Wanted So You Asked For a Submarine Fleet | Owen Booth | Literary Roadhouse Ep 40

Next week’s story is  The Nightingale and the Rose by Oscar Wilde

Are you excited for the Literary Roadhouse Bookclub? It will be a monthly bookclub and our first novel is… The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood! You can get your copy here. The first Friday in January which just happens to be New Years Day. So grab a copy, and tweet along with #LRHBookclub

This week’s story brought to mind politics and the folly of love. I hope you enjoy our discussion as much as we did. What was this story really about? Does that meaning change based on the readers age or experience with love? Or is it really a political allegory?

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate I Told You I’d Buy You Any-thing You Wanted So You Asked For a Submarine Fleet? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

The Necklace | Guy de Maupassant | Literary Roadhouse Ep 39

Next weeks story I Told You I’d Buy You Any-thing You Wanted So You Asked For a Submarine Fleet by Owen Booth

Rated Explicit for Language

Are you excited for the Literary Roadhouse bookclub? It will be a monthly bookclub and our first novel is… The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood! You can get your copy here. We’ll be reading the book through November/December and the first episode will be the first Friday in January which just happens to be New Years Day. So grab a copy, and tweet along with #LRHBookclub

Aw, so Rammy’s second story was another Parable. This one from the 19 century French writer Guy de Maupassant. He is know for his twist endings and is an important part of literary history. Rammy loved the story, Anais and Gerald liked it, and despite her love of long sentences and dusty lit Maya hated it. Oh and if you want to see just how crazy this podcast can get… I suggest watching the end of the live video recording for Rammy’s precious “I’m waiting you to stop with the snarky comments.” lmao

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate The Necklace? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

The Semplica-Girl Diaries | George Saunders | Literary Roadhouse Ep 38

Next weeks story The Necklace is by Guy de Maupassant

Rated Explicit for Language

This episode was full of announcements! First, if you were around the website last week you’ll know that it kept going down. That was because I was hard at work breaking making a entirely new website. While much of the site looks the same, it should be faster and better able to handle the upcoming launch of our second podcast. Anais will be leading the Literary Roadhouse bookclub! It will be a monthly bookclub and our first novel is… The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood! You can get your copy here. We’ll be reading the book through November/December and the first episode will be the first Thursday in January. So grab a copy, and tweet along with #LRHBookclub

Who knew George Saunders was so funny and brilliant, and why didn’t you tell us. Everyone except Rammy was blown away by this story but he kept us from floating away into a love fest. We talk about the laughter, the sadness, masculinity and when art get’s in the way of consumption.

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate The Semplica Girls? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Housebreaking – Sarah Frisch – Literary Roadouse Ep 37

Next weeks story The Semplica-Girl Diaries is by George Saunders

Rated Explicit for Language

ATTN: The website is currently down for re-design. It will be up in a couple days… yeah, oops.

Okay, this has to have been one of the most fun episodes we’ve ever recorded. This week we were split on gender lines with both Anais and Maya struggling to pinpoint why they disliked a story the boys loves so much. The discussion touched on the difference between novel and short story. It gave me a lot to chew on both in my reading and the writing. ~Maya

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” If you want to design a Bradberry, we’d love to see it. On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate “The Largesse of the Sea Maiden”? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Next weeks story The Semplica-Girl Diaries is by George Saunders.

The Largesse of the Sea Maiden – Denis Johnson – Literary Roadhouse Ep 36

Next weeks story is Housebreaking by Sarah Frisch.

Rated Explicit for Language

Gerald and Anais really enjoyed this story, Maya loved it, but Rammy, oh Rammy goes to bat against this story alone and he doesn’t hold back. We discuss the common thread connecting these ten vignettes, and Rammy and Maya question if age is a factor in enjoying this story. Gerald delights us by highlighting the best pearls of wisdom Johnson’s story has to offer, and the narrator’s mental state is brought into question.

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” If you want to design a Bradberry, we’d love to see it. On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate “The Largesse of the Sea Maiden”? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Next weeks story is Housebreaking by Sarah Frisch.