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This Week in Literature – Coming Soon

Maya Goode host of This Week in Literature

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Maya Goode finds the best in weekly literary news and brings it directly to your ears.

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Stripped Down Poetry – Coming Soon

Tamara Woods host of Stripped Down Poetry

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Tamara Woods takes you on a trip into the stories behind poetry with readings and discussions with emerging and established poets.

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Monstress | Lysley A. Tenorio | Ep 50

Next weeks story is The Story Of A Painter by Ludmilla Petrushevskaya

Rated PG-13 for light swearing & joke about porn titles

Monstress is a short story about a couple in The Phillipines who make monster flicks, and how the fall of local cinema at the feet of Hollywood affects their relationship. He is the movie maker; she plays his varied, grotesque monsters. During the discussion Anais and Maya analyze whether the couple love one another and what the actual point of the story is. Gerald is frustrated by the man’s seeming lack of emotional competence and love for the woman. While Rammy enjoyed the soft relationship moments and humor. The podcast finishes with a fun horror movie quiz. There is very light swearing and an off hand joke about porn titles. It is probably fine for upper level HS and above.

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate Montress? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

 

 

Drilling Down The Story – The Bradbury Challenge Ep 3

This week Crissy talks about getting sick and writing her story the night before. She also explores writing a controversial story with the intent to share. Gerald is enjoying his larger project of adding two short stories toward his goal. One of his stories touches on dementia in an interesting way and we discussed writing about varied states of consciousness. Maya ponders writing literary fiction under a deadline and how her mind gestates ideas.

Podcasts mentioned:

The Minimalists

This Week’s Writing Prompt:

Imagine that it is a lovely sunny day. You are taking a walk through a lovely field and woods with your dog, like you always do, on a lovely path. Suddenly, your dog darts off through the underbrush barking. You are calling and your dog isn’t coming back. You go chasing after them and the undergrowth is scratching your legs and the dog frantically barks. Then suddenly the barking stops. When you catch up, you find your dog staring at an old door just standing in the middle of the woods.

The Yellow Wallpaper | Charlotte Perkins Gilman | Literary Roadhouse Ep 49

The Yellow Wallpaper

Next week’s story is Monstress by Lysley A. Tenorio

Rated PG for one mention of the word sex without details or explanation

We really enjoyed this in depth discussion of The Yellow Wallpaper, an important part of the American short story cannon about mental illness and the treatment of women. Written in the late 1800’s this story seems to bridge an old-fashioned writing style, and more modern tension and tones. It is full of symbolism that allowed us to delve deep into the many aspects of this masterpiece. In addition, listening to Rammy figure out the story on air is both fascinating and educational about the process of understanding fiction. I hope you enjoy this episode as much as we did.

Please share your thoughts in the comment section below, or leave a comment using the voicemail function to the right. We may read your voicemail on air, so if you don’t want us to do so, tell us.

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate The Yellow Wallpaper? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Finishing and Finding Ideas – The Bradbury Challenge Ep 2

Crissy, Maya and Gerald warm up and get their feet wet. In this episode, they discuss the joy of finishing, and writing good sentences and how they get ideas.

Links Mentioned in this episode:

The Art of Styling Sentences by Ann Longknife Phd and K.D. Sullivan

Writing Excuses

Crissy Moss’s Website

Gerald’s blog

This Weeks Writing Prompt:

Our prompt comes from Poets & Writers

In Lauren Groff’s novel Fates and Furies (Riverhead Books, 2015) a marriage is detailed first through the husband’s perspective, then the wife’s. His memories are fond, but hers, not so much. Take on that old adage about two sides to every story and pick a supporting character from a novel, film, or short piece, and rewrite a story from his or her point of view. Experiment with how a scene or plot can be completely transformed just by a change of perspective.

Prepositions | Lionel Shriver | Literary Roadhouse Ep 48

Prepositions

Next week’s story is The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Rated Explicit

Whoa, Gerald courted controversy with this story of two widows. The story’s narrator recounts the difference between her widowhood. Her her husband died on 9-11, while her friend’s  husband died in 9-11. That little change in preposition had made all the difference in these two women’s lives. After a few pauses and some gallows humor, we dove deep into this story of sympathy and privilege. Prepositions sparked the first tension between Maya and Rammy over whether a story that is sympathetic to envy is a good or bad position for a story to take. It’s no surprise the story caused tension among our hosts, as the story deals with thorny issues of morality and class. We soon discovered that how the reader interprets the story depends largely on their own experiences with loss and class.

How do you feel about the narrator’s plight? Let us know.

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate Prepositions? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Introducing The Bradbury Challenge Ep 1

Welcome to our newest podcast, The Bradbury Challenge. This podcast chronicles our journey of writing a short story every week for 2016. This challenge was inspired by advice Ray Bradbury gave to aspiring writers. The first part of his advice is to read a short story, an essay and a poem everyday. The second part of his advice is to write at least one short story per week for at least a year, because it isn’t possible to write 52 bad short stories.

In this episode we meet our three hosts; Maya Goode, Crissy Moss and Gerald Hornsby. We discuss our writing lives, what we expect, and how we plan to complete the Bradbury Challenge.

Links mentioned in this week’s episode:

Holy Lisle free course: How to Write Flash Fiction That Doesn’t Suck

Great blog post on a schedule for The Bradbury Challenge

This Weeks Writing Prompt:

In one of my favorite films, We Are What We Are, the family has a dark and troubling secret. Your prompt, should you accept, is to write about a family with a secret.

The Heart Goes Last – Margaret Atwood – Literary Roadhouse Bookclub Ep 1

Discussion Notes: The Heart Goes Last

Rated Explicit

Yay!  The Literary Roadhouse Bookclub is here and we discussed The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood. It led to quite the debate and I can’t wait for the next book. For the next month’s episode we will discuss Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff.

If you have any suggestions for the new bookclub please let us know in the comments. We also have a voicemail system on the website; if you would like to leave a voicemail and perhaps have us play your comments about Fates and Furies or The Heart Goes Last, please click the green bar that says voicemail. We air the first Friday of every month and discuss the books on twitter using #LRHBookclub

Additional Books Mentioned:

The Handmaids Tale

The MaddAddam Trilogy

Year’s End | Jhumpa Lahiri | Literary Roadhouse Ep 47

Discussion Notes: Year’s End

Next week’s story is Prepositions by Lionel Shriver

Rated Okay

Happy Holidays! This week we discuss Year’s End, a story about a young Indian-American college student who must once again process the death of his mother after an announcement that his father has re-married several years after his mother’s death. This story sparked some great discussion on pain, clichés and culture in literature. Enjoy!

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate Year’s End? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.