Weekly Short Stories

Each week The Literary Roadhouse podcast hosts deeply read and discuss one short story.

Monstress | Lysley A. Tenorio | Ep 50

Next weeks story is The Story Of A Painter by Ludmilla Petrushevskaya

Rated PG-13 for light swearing & joke about porn titles

Monstress is a short story about a couple in The Phillipines who make monster flicks, and how the fall of local cinema at the feet of Hollywood affects their relationship. He is the movie maker; she plays his varied, grotesque monsters. During the discussion Anais and Maya analyze whether the couple love one another and what the actual point of the story is. Gerald is frustrated by the man’s seeming lack of emotional competence and love for the woman. While Rammy enjoyed the soft relationship moments and humor. The podcast finishes with a fun horror movie quiz. There is very light swearing and an off hand joke about porn titles. It is probably fine for upper level HS and above.

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate Montress? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

 

 

The Yellow Wallpaper | Charlotte Perkins Gilman | Literary Roadhouse Ep 49

The Yellow Wallpaper

Next week’s story is Monstress by Lysley A. Tenorio

Rated PG for one mention of the word sex without details or explanation

We really enjoyed this in depth discussion of The Yellow Wallpaper, an important part of the American short story cannon about mental illness and the treatment of women. Written in the late 1800’s this story seems to bridge an old-fashioned writing style, and more modern tension and tones. It is full of symbolism that allowed us to delve deep into the many aspects of this masterpiece. In addition, listening to Rammy figure out the story on air is both fascinating and educational about the process of understanding fiction. I hope you enjoy this episode as much as we did.

Please share your thoughts in the comment section below, or leave a comment using the voicemail function to the right. We may read your voicemail on air, so if you don’t want us to do so, tell us.

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate The Yellow Wallpaper? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Prepositions | Lionel Shriver | Literary Roadhouse Ep 48

Prepositions

Next week’s story is The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Rated Explicit

Whoa, Gerald courted controversy with this story of two widows. The story’s narrator recounts the difference between her widowhood. Her her husband died on 9-11, while her friend’s  husband died in 9-11. That little change in preposition had made all the difference in these two women’s lives. After a few pauses and some gallows humor, we dove deep into this story of sympathy and privilege. Prepositions sparked the first tension between Maya and Rammy over whether a story that is sympathetic to envy is a good or bad position for a story to take. It’s no surprise the story caused tension among our hosts, as the story deals with thorny issues of morality and class. We soon discovered that how the reader interprets the story depends largely on their own experiences with loss and class.

How do you feel about the narrator’s plight? Let us know.

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate Prepositions? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Year’s End | Jhumpa Lahiri | Literary Roadhouse Ep 47

Discussion Notes: Year’s End

Next week’s story is Prepositions by Lionel Shriver

Rated Okay

Happy Holidays! This week we discuss Year’s End, a story about a young Indian-American college student who must once again process the death of his mother after an announcement that his father has re-married several years after his mother’s death. This story sparked some great discussion on pain, clichés and culture in literature. Enjoy!

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate Year’s End? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Kudzu | Andrea Bobotis | Literary Roadhouse Ep 46

Next week’s story is Years End by Jhumpa Lahiri

Rated Explicit

Kudzu is a story about the negative sides of motherhood. It prompted an interesting discussion about symbolism and the current literary voice. This episode is an inverse of last weeks discussion with Maya enjoying the story and Anais, Gerald and Rammy exposing weaknesses in the story. Enjoy!

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate Kudzu? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Arrangements | Charles Watts | Literary Roadhouse Ep 45

Next week’s story is Kudzu by Andrea Bobotis

Rated decent

Arrangements explored the everyday judgements and stories we tell ourselves about strangers we see. Everyone seemed to like this week’s story except Maya. Was it the sudden scene changes, or does Maya just hate stories when we record too early?

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate Arrangements? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Wagons, Ho! | Padgett Powell | Literary Roadhouse Ep 44

Next week’s story is Arrangements by Charles Watts

Rated none too shabby

This week it was up to Anais to convince Maya, Gerald and Rammy of the genius of Wagons, Ho! The story left Maya irritated, Rammy annoyed and Gerald… tad confused about were he stood. The genius was apparent, but did the author lose his audience in this experiment? Anais shouts No. Maya and Rammy role their eyes and form a wall. Poor Gerald is left somewhere in the middle. Does he move closer to Maya and Rammy, or does Anais convince him of the subtle genius and lure him to the dark side?

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate Wagons, Ho? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Happy Endings | Margaret Atwood | Literary Roadhouse Ep 43

Next week’s story is Wagons, Ho! by Padgett Powell

Rated not too bad

Happy Endings is a short story the plays on the novel outlining to reflect on life, relationships, and the process of writing. In this discussion, we talk about the deeper meanings of the story, whether the format worked and what each of us took away from this exploration of what makes a story… the beginning, middle or end.

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate Happy Endings? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Cities I’ve Never Lived In | Sara Majka | Literary Roadhouse Ep 42

Cities I’ve Never Lived In

Next week’s story is Happy Endings by Margaret Atwood

Rated Clean

Cities I’ve Never Lived In was a story that slowly grew on all of us. Interesting choices in writing style and deep intellectual questions made it a great story for discussion. The story’s layers are emblematic of Hemingway’s iceberg theory, which tickled our resident emingway fan boy, Gerald. Listen as we discuss the effectiveness of essay style and tone, the narrators choices, and how this story about the ethics of poverty-based art affected us.

Are you excited for the Literary Roadhouse bookclub? It will be a monthly bookclub and our first novel is… The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood! You can get your copy here. If you want to talk to us about the book as you read, we are using the #LRHBookclub. We also will launch a second new podcast called The Bradbury Challenge.

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate Cites I’ve never lived in? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

The Nightingale and The Rose | Oscar Wilde | Literary Roadhouse Ep 41

Next week’s story is Cities I’ve Never Lived in by Sarah Majka

Rated Clean

Are you excited for the Literary Roadhouse bookclub? It will be a monthly bookclub and our first novel is… The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood! You can get your copy here. We’ll be reading the book through November/December and the first episode will be the first Friday in January which just happens to be New Years Day. So grab a copy, and tweet along with #LRHBookclub

This week we leave you with Anais trying to explain why the only good thing about The Nightingale and The Rose was the lizard. We had a great conversation about the many layers or non-layers of this great Oscar Wilde story, how it reflects the differences in how we see romance over time. Were the humans selfish, or only the girl? Was the bird a fool? Why doesn’t Anais like this story! Stay tuned and stay for a super interesting LRH game at the end cause Rammy outdid himself.

Don’t forget to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” On a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate The Nightingale and The Rose? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.