Weekly Short Stories

Each week The Literary Roadhouse podcast hosts deeply read and discuss one short story.

The Missing Episode

6 months, 4 hosts… I never thought it would happen. Last weeks recorded episode will not be released until Wednesday. This means, we finally missed an episode but it wasn’t for lack of trying. A problematic computer, an upgrade… a missing driver with an invisibility cloak all combined until I was completely unable to edit the episode and have you heard us raw? No really, editing is so not optional. So on Wednesday, you will finally get to hear us talk about James Baldwin and the audio will be edited by Anais. Please be nice to her, it’s only her second time. Hopefully in two weeks, I’ll be on a nice new shiny system and we’ll all be back to our regularly scheduled lives. Oh and Wednesday’s episode… it’s fantastic so don’t miss it.

Love,

Maya

 

The Start of the Affair – Nuruddin Farah – Literary Roadhouse Ep 27

Next week’s story is Sonny’s Blues by James Baldwin. You can also read it here.

This podcast is available on iTunes, Stitcher, and Spreaker. Please take a few moments to leave a review (for Spreaker follow & heart us). Those reviews encourage us and help us be found by new listeners.

Rated Explicit

This week Rammy joined us for an unexpectedly lively discussion. It was an odd episode where we spent half the time debating the actual content of the story. Anais and Gerald came into the conversation sure of summary and ready to record. Then it was immediately clear that Rammy and Maya read the same story so differently that it was almost like discussing two different stories.

Don’t forget, to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” If you want to design a Bradberry, we’d love to see it.

Listeners gave last week’s story “The Empty Family” by Colm Tóibín 5 Bradberries.

So tell us, on a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate “The Start of the Affair“? More importantly, was James black or white? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Next week’s story is Sonny’s Blues by James Baldwin. You can also read it here.

The Empty Family – Colm Tóibín – Literary Roadhouse Ep 26

Next week’s story is The Start of the Affair by Nuruddin Farah.

This podcast is available on iTunes, Stitcher, and Spreaker. Please take a few moments to leave a review (for Spreaker follow & heart us). Those reviews encourage us and help us be found by new listeners.

Rated clean for language, but not so clean for audio quality. Maya spent the week at a writer’s conference, and Anais edited the audio for the first time. Please forgive the audio rookie.

This week we read a short story by Irish author Colm Tóibín, whose novel The Blackwater Lightship Gerald has read before. Gerald loved the short story, but Maya and Anais who are new to Tóibín had lukewarm feelings towards the story. Anais was turned off by the lack of conflict, and Maya was alienated by a surprisingly distant voice for a first person narrative.

Don’t forget, to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” If you want to design a Bradberry, we’d love to see it.

Listeners gave last week’s story “Cathedral” by Raymond Carver 5 Bradberries.

So tell us, on a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate “The Empty Family”? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Next week’s story is The Start of the Affair by Nuruddin Farah.

Cathedral – Raymond Carver – Literary Roadhouse Ep 25

Next week’s story is The Empty Family by Colm Tóibín

This podcast is available on iTunes, Stitcher, and Spreaker. Please take a few moments to leave a review (for Spreaker follow & heart us). Those reviews encourage us and help us be found by new listeners.

Rated Explicit

We read our first Carver story this week and it prompted a great discussion. Maya has been reading through Carver’s body of work and found the reading experience very different compared to Anais. Gerald was turned off by the narrator, and we delved a bit into how we feel when we confront a main character we don’t like.

Don’t forget, to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” If you want to design a Bradberry, we’d love to see it.

Listeners gave last week’s story “Safe, Somewhere” by Baird Harper 3.75 Bradberries.

So tell us, on a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate “Safe, Somewhere”? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Next week’s story is The Empty Family by Colm Tóibín

Gerald’s Summer Road Trip in France

Seven weeks my wife, our dog, and I were away from home, most of the time without WiFi, which curtailed my ability to contribute to the Literary Roadhouse podcast. But now we’re back, with no immediate plans for long-term breaks, so normal service has been resumed.

I wanted to share with you the highlights from our little trip. Firstly, some background: we’ve been motor homing for our holidays since 2006, we retired in 2008, and we’re on our third motor home.

Our van. Our van.

We always enjoy traveling to France, where there is a bigger choice of places to stay than here in the UK.

Our route. Our route.

Some places we only stayed one night, as we traveled between towns, but our biggest stay was on an island off the West coast of France called Île de Ré, which is a beautiful island, much favoured by holidaying Parisians during August, and has a number of small, picture-postcard beautiful towns all connected by mostly traffic-free cycle paths. We did lots of cycling.

And visited some lovely towns and villages.

But it wasn’t all go. We needed a break to visit markets.

And take in the view.

Eat out occasionally.

Enjoy our own little barbecue.

Visit the occasional bar.

Enjoy a breakfast out sometimes.

And for Tess to play the fool.

And of course, I had to do some reading.

We had a great time!

Safe, Somewhere – Baird Harper – Literary Roadhouse Ep 24

Next week’s story is Cathedral by Raymond Carver

This podcast is available on iTunes, Stitcher, and Spreaker. Please take a few moments to leave a review (for Spreaker follow & heart us). Those reviews encourage us and help us be found by new listeners.

Rated Explicit: Story contains mention of brothel, no cursing or explicit language but a kid might ask what a brothel is.

Oh, we didn’t seem to agree on anything this week. Anais had serious issues with Safe, Somewhere. Gerald liked it a great deal and Maya was head over heels in love with the story. The funny thing was, even though Gerald and Maya liked it, they saw many parts very differently. This story of a small one-company town was eye opening and fun to discuss.

Don’t forget, to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” If you want to design a Bradberry, we’d love to see it.

Listeners gave last week’s story “In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson is Buried” by Amy Hempel 4.5 Bradberries.

So tell us, on a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate “Safe, Somewhere”? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Next week’s story is Cathedral by Raymond Carver

In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson is Buried – Amy Hempel – Literary Roadhouse Ep 23

Next week’s story is Safe, Somewhere by Baird Harper

This podcast is available on iTunes, Stitcher, and Spreaker. Please take a few moments to leave a review (for Spreaker follow & heart us). Those reviews encourage us and help us be found by new listeners.

Rated Explicit

Guess who’s back! After a long vacation driving around Europe, Gerald joins us for a discussion of the short story, In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson is Buried. It sounds like he had a great trip and will soon write a post about his adventures. This week’s story touches on themes of death in a novel and brutally transparent way. It’s a story that touched us and brought up topics such as guilt, details in writing, and what it is that makes you trust a writer. I hope you enjoy this discussion as much as I did.

Don’t forget, to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” If you want to design a Bradberry, we’d love to see it.

Listeners gave last week’s story “The Servant’s Daughter” 2.75 Bradberries.

So tell us, on a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson is Buried? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Next week’s story is Safe, Somewhere by Baird Harper

The Servant’s Daughter – Paulo Coelho – Literay Roadhouse Ep 22

Next week’s story is In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson is Buried by Amy Hempel

This podcast is available on iTunes, Stitcher, and Spreaker. Please take a few moments to leave a review (for Spreaker follow & heart us). Those reviews encourage us and help us be found by new listeners.

Rated Squeaky Clean

There is a sound issue and while I was able to correct most of it, this episode is not perfect. I do apologize for the inconvienience.

This week our guest co-host is the novelist, teacher and podcaster Aaron Gansky. He was a wonderful part of the discussion on how to modernize oral tradition stories for the modern reader. The Servant’s Daughter was the first parable for Literary Roadhouse and was a perfect catalyst for this important discussion.

Don’t forget, to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” If you want to design a Bradberry, we’d love to see it.

So tell us, on a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate The Servant’s Daughter? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Next week’s story is In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson is Buried by Amy Hempel

Sodom and Gomorrah – Adam Mcomber – Literary Roadhouse Ep 21

Next week’s story is The Servant’s Daughter as popularized by Paulo Coelho

This podcast is available on iTunes, Stitcher, and Spreaker. Please take a few moments to leave a review (for Spreaker follow & heart us). Those reviews encourage us and help us be found by new listeners.

Rated Explicit

The true genius of Anais and our guest co-host Rammy shines this week. Due to a family emergency, Maya completely missed the podcast and Gerald is on the tale end of his amazingly awesome vacation. We expect Gerald either next week or the one after! Personally, I can’t wait to hear all about his adventures.

This week’s story tells the story of Sodom and Gomorrah from the side of the fornicators. We discover just how geeky Anais can get as she links various mythologies and themes. Then Rammy surprised her with the depth of homosexual themes that she missed. While they both had issues with the story, we get to hear a good conversation that deepened their appreciation of it.

Don’t forget, to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” If you want to design a Bradberry, we’d love to see it.

Y’all rated The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula Le Guin 5 Bradberries.

So tell us, on a scale of 1-6 Bradberries, how do you rate Sodom and Gomorrah? Tell us in the comments below or via voicemail, and we will give the final tally on the next episode.

Next week we are reading The Servant’s Daughter by Paulo Coelho

The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas – Ursula Le Guin – Literary Roadhouse Ep 20

Next week’s story Sodom and Gomorrah by Adam Mcomber

This podcast is available on iTunes, Stitcher, and Spreaker. Please take a few moments to leave a review (for Spreaker follow & heart us). Those reviews encourage us and help us be found by new listeners

Rated G

Please Pardon the audio quality on this episode. I upgraded editors and am still learning all the bells and whistles in the hopes that future episodes will be much more clear and enjoyable.

Gerald is now in France and we are missing our best buddy. We had a great co-host scheduled but he had had technical difficulties so it was just us girls. We had a lot of fun discussing the political underpinnings of The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas. The big question still nags, is the well being of many enough to out way the misery of one. Maya tried to play devils advocate and see the story from a conservative point of view; spoiler… she failed.

Don’t forget, to rate the story! For the history of our goofy system, see Anais’ post “Read Short Stories or Ray Bradbury Cries.” If you want to design a Bradberry, we’d love to see it. Y’all rated The Masque of the Red Death by Edgar Allan Poe 4.33 bradberries.

Next week’s story Sodom and Gomorrah by Adam Mcomber